The Source for Whistleblowers, Journalists, Legislators & Academics

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The Source for Whistleblowers

WhistleblowerLaws.com provide the latest in Information, legal development, news and free consultation to those considering blowing the whistle on fraud.

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False Claims Acts

In addition to the Federal False Claims Act, 29 states, 2 cities and the District of Columbia have False Claims Acts.

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Backed by Experienced Attorneys

WhistleblowerLaws.com is backed by some of the most experienced attorneys in False Claims Act litigation.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Whistleblower FAQs

The laws governing whistleblowing and protecting whistleblowers can be confusing and complicated. We have answers to some of the initial questions potential whistleblowers may have.

Whistleblower Protection

Many whistleblowers face retaliation for shedding light on the truth. These statutes provide protections for whistleblower.

News & Commentary

Stay up-to-date with news affecting whistleblowers and all things related to False Claims Act and Qui Tam litigation with insight and commentary by our panels of experts.

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If you think your employer is committing fraud, whether it involves pharmaceuticals, Medicaid and Medicare, government or defense contracting, securities, education or fraudulent loans and grants, please feel free to contact us. We would love to hear from you!


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WhistleblowerLaws blog

The Whistleblowers in the White House

I practice law. My clients have been called sneaks and snitches. I just call them “whistleblowers.” If they sue a culprit who has defrauded the government under the False Claims Act against, I might also call them “relators.”[2] I try to explain to people that the term whistleblower is quintessentially American. It is about challenging accepted but fundamentally wrong practices; indeed, ones carried out by established or respected people or institutions, including corporations and government. And though the term “whistleblower” was coined around the activities of Ralph Nader in the 1960s and 1970s, whistleblowers have been around since the birth of our nation.[3] One need only consider challenges to British Rule and claims of taxation without representation to understand the importance of whistleblowing in our founding. We talk about the “progressive tradition,” but isn’t that tradition about second-guessing rules that are just not right – rules like slavery, “separate but equal,” and a way of life that denied, and continues to deny, equal rights for women and minorities? And aren’t the folks who stick their necks out to make these challenges just good old American whistleblowers? No doubt though, until their complaint is vetted and their cause pressed to completion, they will be called snitches, even if, at the end of the day, their epitaphs herald them as heroes. This week we learned that we have whistleblowers in the White House, some of whom cooperated with reporter Bob Woodward, and one of whom penned an Op Ed for the New York Times.[4] True

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WhistleblowerLaws News

Mass. Hospital Double-Booked Surgeries, Whistleblower Says

By Dani Kass Law360, New York (October 20, 2017, 7:50 PM EDT) -- A former Massachusetts General Hospital anesthesiologist on Thursday told a federal judge that she's sufficiently shown in her qui tam suit that the hospital violated the False Claims Act when double-booking surgeries, even though she hasn't been able

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What is Qui Tam

In its simplest form, a qui tam lawsuit is brought forth by a citizen, known as a “relator” or whistleblower, against a company, person or entity, that he or she knows is in some way cheating the federal and/or state governments. Since the qui tam suit is brought in the name of the relator on behalf of the government, the government may actually join the case and litigate alongside the relator’s lawyers. Through this website you can educate yourself on the process, the law, your rights and protections and contact a lawyer who can help advise you.

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What do I do?

If I Witness Corporate Misconduct, What Should I Do? Many corporations have internal compliance programs for corporate misconduct. These programs are, in theory, designed to provide an outlet for workers who want to report unethical or illegal corporate conduct. The question of whether to report company misconduct internally is both personal and strategic. Those who have made the decision that the wrongdoing needs to be reported are probably ready to consult counsel. Legal counsel can be very helpful in providing guidance on how to best address wrongful conduct in the workplace.

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Am I protected?

This site lists the various statutes which protect whistleblowers from retaliation here. Federal law, at 31 U.S.C.S. § 3730(h) provides for 2 times any back pay, plus interest if you are let go, suspended or demoted after reporting misconduct. In addition, you are also entitled to any special damages you might have suffered. This includes reinstatement of seniority status, reimbursement of litigation costs and reasonable attorneys’ fees. An employee may bring an action in the appropriate District Court of the United States for the relief provided in this subsection.

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Get Organized

  • Who is involved in the fraud?
  • What actions do you think are fraudulent?
  • When did the fraud occur?
  • What role did those involved play?
  • When did you find out?
  • Have you talked to anyone?
  • Have you lost your job?
  • Have you already taken legal action?
  • Contact us
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